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Snow on the Road

Snow on the Road

22 Episodes

Dan Snow hits the road, visiting Britain's best historical sites.

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Snow on the Road
  • Inverness: Castles and Cairns

    The Scottish Highlands are filled with wild, dramatic cliffs, soaring mountains and skies that stretch out across the lochs. But they are also steeped in history, and filled with powerfully emotive and atmospheric sites. From the Bronze Age Clava Cairns to Culloden Battlefield, site of the final,...

  • Bristol: Aerospace Museum

    This was our first city road trip for Snow on the Road - 3 days in Bristol visiting its most interesting historical sites. What's so wonderful about Bristol is how its history is interwoven into the fabric of the city. World treasures like the SS Great Britain and Underfall Yard are visible all a...

  • Bristol: SS Great Britain

    This was our first city road trip for Snow on the Road - 3 days in Bristol visiting its most interesting historical sites. What's so wonderful about Bristol is how its history is interwoven into the fabric of the city. World treasures like the SS Great Britain and Underfall Yard are visible all a...

  • Bristol: Clifton Suspension Bridge

    The Clifton Suspension Bridge isn't just one of the most beautiful bridges in the country - it's also one of the most innovative. It was designed by the legendary engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel, though he didn't live to see it completed. One of the many astonishing things about the bridge is th...

  • Bristol: Birthplace of Methodism

    Today, more than 75 million people worldwide call themselves Methodists - but this vast movement had its origins in a humble location in Bristol. Here, John Wesley created a centre for preaching, lodging and welfare. He called it the New Room - and it still operated today, the oldest methodist bu...

  • Bristol: Glenside Hospital Museum

    A few miles northeast of central Bristol is a site that for many years offered treatment or refuge for people with psychological issues. Originally called Bristol Lunatic Asylum, it has since been through many changes of name and purpose. Now the site is a university, but the 19th century hospita...

  • Bristol: Underfall Yard

    This was our first city road trip for Snow on the Road - 3 days in Bristol visiting its most interesting historical sites. What's so wonderful about Bristol is how its history is interwoven into the fabric of the city. World treasures like the SS Great Britain and Underfall Yard are visible all a...

  • A Tour of St Mary's House in Bramber

    The town of Bramber in West Sussex is rich in history. As the sea used to come in right by the town, it was long-used as a crossing point for those seeking to sail over to the European continent. Bramber’s coastal location also made it a sound strategic settlement, something which was not lost on...

  • A Tour of Arundel Castle

    Arundel Castle is one West Sussex’s greatest attractions with a history spanning nearly a thousand years. It has its roots in Norman times, originally built at the end of the 11th century by the then Earl of Arundel, Roger de Montgomery. The keep Montgomery created was initially made out of wood,...

  • Uncovering the Enigma: Bletchley Park

    Bletchley Park is now internationally famous as the home of the code-breakers during World War Two. But the endeavours of Alan Turing, Dilly Knox and their colleagues were so top secret that we are only now beginning to learn how they really lived day-to-day in this magnificent house, where – beh...

  • A Tour of Fishbourne Palace

    In 1960, a man was laying a waterpipe underneath the quaint village of Fishbourne near Chichester, West Sussex, when he uncovered what looked like Roman remains. After he duly reported the discover, the archaeologists were called in and they quickly unearthed more and more prestigious finds. They...

  • A Tour of the Althorp House Art Collection

    Situated in the heart of Northamptonshire, Althorp House is one of the most magnificent stately homes in Britain. Since the sixteenth century it has been the home of the Spencers, a family with a prestigious history that only a handful of ménages can match. Charles I, Sarah Churchill, Winston Chu...

  • North Wales

    North Wales is famous for its heroic, mountainous landscape and its abundance of fascinating historical sites. The area that was known as the Kingdom of Gwynedd for almost a millennium is steeped in history: right across the mountainous stronghold of Snowdonia one finds ancient battlements, extra...

  • The Western Front

    The Western Front, a 400-plus-mile stretch of land weaving through France and Belgium from the Swiss border to the North Sea, was the decisive front during World War One. Despite the global nature of the conflict, much of the world remembers the scars of the Great War through the lens of these ba...

  • Lincoln Castle

    Lincoln is one of the most historic settlements in Britain: from being the site of a key legionary fort in Roman times to its towering cathedral being the first landmark British bomber crews would see upon their return from daring raids over Nazi-occupied Europe during World War Two. At Lincoln's...

  • Liverpool's Hidden Heritage

    Many of Britain's most iconic historical sights stand supreme in the open for all to see: Hadrian's Wall, Stonehenge, St Paul's Cathedral and the country's abundance of castles for instance. Yet beneath our cities and towns too, stunning structures and buildings of the past have been painstakingl...

  • North Devon and Dorset

    The ever intrepid Dan Snow heads to the southwest of Britain to uncover the region's historical gems. These include a Benedictine Abbey that was dissolved during Henry VIII's reign, tunnels beneath the city of Exeter and Nothe Fort in Weymouth, built in the late 19th century.

  • The Channel Islands: Guernsey

    Dan's on the road again. This time he's in Guernsey, an island rich in history and within sight of the French coast. From the house of the exiled, 19th century French writer Victor Hugo to the extensive, underground, concrete tunnels constructed by the Germans during World War Two, join Dan as he...

  • Saint Helena

    They needed a prison for the most dangerous man in the World. Napoleon had seized supreme power in France. He’d marched his armies from Portugal to Moscow. But now he was a prisoner. His captors needed a prison from which escape was unthinkable. Their answer lay in the South Atlantic. A scrap of ...

  • A Tour of The Wings Museum in West Sussex

    The Wings Museum’s unique collection and style makes it a must-see attraction for any World War Two enthusiast.

  • Redcliffe Caves

    Redcliffe Caves are a series of man made tunnels beneath the Redcliffe area of Bristol, England. The Triassic red sandstone was dug into in the Middle ages to provide sand for glass making and pottery production. Further excavation took place from the 17th to early 19th centuries and used for sto...

  • The Western Front Tunnels

    The creation of man-made underground tunnels played a huge role in the outcome of the First World War. They were first dug to mine under enemy positions and detonate bombs or attack in desperate and fierce fights. As the war dragged on, nevertheless, they developed another purpose: providing sold...