Victorian

Victorian

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Victorian
  • The Lady with the Lamp: The Florence Nightingale Museum

    Alice Loxton pays a visit to The Florence Nightingale Museum to unveil the true story of the Lady with the Lamp. Joined by David Green and Amber Lickerish, she learns how Nightingale broke through the restrictions of Victorian convention, laid the foundations for modern nursing, and tirelessly ca...

  • HMS Warrior

    In the late 1850s, Britain and France were involved in an arms race. Both sides were embracing new technologies like armour plating to try and create the ultimate battleship. In 1860 this produced the revolutionary HMS Warrior, a product of Britain's naval mastery in the 19th century and the Indu...

  • The Uniform of the British Army

    The British Army is one of the world’s most experienced fighting forces. From Blenheim to Waterloo, from Balaclava to the Somme, it has played its part in the history’s most bloody conflicts. But as these troops executed Herculean tasks in the worlds harshest terrains, what were they wearing? How...

  • Queen Victoria at Kensington Palace with Lucy Worsley

    BAFTA winning historian and Joint Chief Curator of Historic Royal Palaces Lucy Worsley takes Dan on a tour of Kensington Palace, one of the principle royal residences since 1689. It was the childhood home of Queen Victoria who was born on the 24 May 1819. The rooms of the royal residence are bein...

  • The Real Peaky Blinders

    19th century Birmingham was famous for its industrial might, but particular parts of it were also renowned for a more infamous reason: its gangs. Dan headed up to Birmingham to meet bestselling author and celebrity local historian Carl Chinn to learn the true history behind Birmingham's most noto...

  • Bristol: SS Great Britain

    This was our first city road trip for Snow on the Road - 3 days in Bristol visiting its most interesting historical sites. What's so wonderful about Bristol is how its history is interwoven into the fabric of the city. World treasures like the SS Great Britain and Underfall Yard are visible all a...

  • Dinner With Dickens

    ‘Heaped up on the floor, to form a kind of throne, were turkeys, geese, game, poultry, brawn, great joints of meat, sucking-pigs, long wreaths of sausages, mince-pies, plum-puddings, barrels of oysters, red-hot chestnuts, cherry-cheeked apples, juicy oranges, luscious pears, immense twelfth-cakes...

  • Broadway Tower: A Folly of Delight and Daring

    High on the peak of the Cotswolds stands one of the most remarkable buildings in Britain. Built as a folly in the final days of the 18th century, Broadway Tower sprung up during the height of the French Revolutionary Wars under the distracted watch of the architect James Wyatt. In the following y...

  • A Strange Bit of History

    We were delighted to have comedy royalty on the podcast. Omid Djalili talked to me about one of his earliest stage creations, first performed at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in 1993. Over the next four years it was performed 109 times in 10 different countries. The backdrop of this epic storytel...

  • Inside Blenheim Palace

    One of the grandest private houses in the world, the site of Blenheim Palace has been host to the murder of a royal mistress, the downfall of a quarrelling Duchess and the birth of Sir Winston Churchill. Dan Snow takes a tour of one of Britain's most famous attractions.

  • The Anglo-Zulu War

    Saul David - historian, broadcaster and author of several critically-acclaimed works of fiction and non-fiction - comes on the show to discuss the most brutal and controversial British imperial conflict of the 19th century: the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879.

  • Dan's Dickensian Christmas

    Dan Snow is treated to a range of Dickensian Christmas delights courtesy of historian Pen Vogler, from mince pies to Charles Dickens' favourite punch.

  • Forgotten Heroines of the East End

    Katie Wignall, founder of Lookup London, shines a light on the stories of several heroines who transformed the East End of London: Annie Besant, Annie Brewster and Sylvia Pankhurst. From writers to activists and nurses, Katie explains how the legacy of these women endures to this day.

  • Victorian Happiness

    A recent study published in the science journal Nature tracked the emotional tone of books and newspapers over the past 200 years and suggested that the British were happier in the 19th century. This rang alarms at History Hit HQ. So we got Hannah Woods on the pod pronto to talk us through the re...

  • Bristol: Underfall Yard

    This was our first city road trip for Snow on the Road - 3 days in Bristol visiting its most interesting historical sites. What's so wonderful about Bristol is how its history is interwoven into the fabric of the city. World treasures like the SS Great Britain and Underfall Yard are visible all a...

  • The Great Hunger

    The Great Famine, or the Great Hunger was a period of mass starvation and disease in Ireland from 1845 - 1849. Over one million people perished. Presenter and producer Matt Sullivan explains several extraordinary stories that occurred during this harrowing period in Ireland's history.

  • The Trial of Jack The Ripper?

    In 1888 and 1889, a vicious serial killer haunted the streets of London. Five prostitutes were brutally murdered in Whitechapel, and all except one of the five victims - Elizabeth Stride - were horribly mutilated. And those are only the murders officially linked to the killer; it’s likely he took...

  • The House of Byron

    Emily Brand has written a brilliant book about the Byrons. Not just the great romantic, poet and adventurer, George Gordon Byron, but his parents and grandparents who are equally as deserving of our attention. Dan loved this opportunity to delve into 18th century British life. There are admirals,...

  • Saragarhi: The True Story

    On the 12th September 1897, 21 soldiers of the 36th Sikh Regiment of Bengal Infantry defended a small communications post against the onslaught of 10,000 enemy tribesmen. In doing so they would set in stone a legendary tale of heroism and devotion to duty that has never since been surpassed.

  • Bristol: Clifton Suspension Bridge

    The Clifton Suspension Bridge isn't just one of the most beautiful bridges in the country - it's also one of the most innovative. It was designed by the legendary engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel, though he didn't live to see it completed. One of the many astonishing things about the bridge is th...

  • European Prosperity in the 19th Century with Orlando Figes

    Orlando Figes talks to Dan about social and technological developments and their links with cultural changes back in the 19th century.

  • Frankenstein Live!

    1 season

    History Hit TV were at Living Literature's Living Frankenstein event and you can exclusively watch the talks that were given on that evening if you missed them on the night.

  • Drake's Island: Plymouth's Island Fortress

    For generations, Drake's Island, situated just outside of Plymouth harbour, had been owned by the Ministry of Defence. Recently, however, this island bastion has gone into private ownership. In this documentary Bob King, the gatekeeper of Drake's Island, gives Dan an exclusive tour of this extrem...

  • Africa: Written out of History

    Historian Luke Pepera looks at how and why the history of Africa was written out of world history. He also explores how and why, as a consequence of this, the history of Africans in Britain was written out of British history.