🎧 Not Just the Tudors

🎧 Not Just the Tudors

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Suzannah Lipscomb talks about everything from the Aztecs to witches, Velázquez to Shakespeare, Mughal India to the Mayflower. Not, in other words, just the Tudors, but most definitely also the Tudors.

Each episode Suzannah is joined by historians and experts to reveal incredible stories about one of the most fascinating periods in history.

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🎧 Not Just the Tudors
  • 🎧 17th Century Revolutionary England

    In the 17th Century, people experienced major social and economic problems that intertwined with religious disagreements and political debates. The turbulence led to civil war, the execution of King Charles I and a failed experiment with Republicanism. But what led Britain into this world turned ...

  • 🎧 Pieter Bruegel the Elder: Renaissance Painter

    During a time of increasing religious and political conflict, Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s paintings portrayed work and pleasure, rituals and festivals of peasant life, and biblical scenes - all in startling detail. Inspired by humanist principles, Bruegel’s art questioned how well we know ourselve...

  • 🎧 Who Painted Anne Dudley? A Tudor Mystery

    For centuries, the name of an accomplished and popular portrait painter in the court of Elizabeth I has remained unknown. The renowned art historian Sir Roy Strong dubbed this artist the ‘Master of the Countess of Warwick’ but his identity has remained a mystery - until now. A fascinating new exh...

  • 🎧 Anne Boleyn’s Final Year

    Anne Boleyn’s reputation is buried beneath centuries of labels: home-wrecker, seductress, opportunist, witch, romantic victim, Protestant martyr, feminist. But a new look at the final year of Anne Boleyn’s life reveals a very human portrait of a brilliant, passionate and complex woman.

    In this e...

  • 🎧 Menstruation in Early Modern England

    Today we know that menstruation is a biological process. There’s a great deal of scientific research that explains the menstrual cycle. But how was menstruation perceived and understood in Early Modern England? Was it talked about by women and men in the same way? How did it influence attitudes t...

  • 🎧 The Myth of 'Western Civilisation'

    'Western Civilisation' is often thought of as a continuous thread through the centuries - from classical antiquity to the countries of the modern West - connecting Plato to NATO. 

    But in her new book - The West: A New History of an Old Idea - archaeologist and historian Professor Naoìse Mac Swee...

  • 🎧 Katherine of Aragon: England’s First Renaissance Queen

    In preparation for International Women's Day this Wednesday, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb takes a look at a Queen whose reputation has largely been shaped by her husband's midlife crisis. History does not see much further than Katherine of Aragon's so-called failure to provide Henry with a son and...

  • 🎧 Jews & the Inquisition in Italy

    Between 1598 and 1785, the Papal or Roman Inquisition in Modena, Northern Italy, put 393 Jews on trial. Regarded as infidels, Jews were accused of, among other things, blasphemy, employing a Christian servant, owning prohibited books, and having sex with Christians. But the trials belie a somewha...

  • 🎧 The Death of Amy Dudley

    On 6 September 1560, Amy Robsart Dudley died after falling down a staircase at Cumnor Place in Oxfordshire. But did she fall? Was she pushed? Or did she throw herself down the stairs? These questions exercised Tudor courtiers and foreign ambassadors at the time. The truth mattered because Amy was...

  • 🎧 The Blood Countess: Elizabeth Bathory

    In the early seventeenth century, a Hungarian aristocrat called Erzsébet Báthory - or Elizabeth Bathory - was accused of murdering more than 600 young women. Her gruesome story has been sensationalised in books, film, and music. But is it true?

    In this explainer episode of Not Just the Tudors, P...

  • 🎧 Mary Queen of Scots’ Lost Letters Decoded

    The most important discovery related to Mary Queen of Scots for 100 years was recently made - by a team of amateur cryptologists.

    In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks with Dr. George Lasry - a computer scientist by day - about how he and his colleagues found...

  • 🎧 The House of Guise: Europe's Most Murderous Dynasty?

    The rich and powerful Guise family was one of the most treacherous and bloodthirsty in sixteenth-century France. They whipped up religious bigotry, overthrowing the king. They ruled Scotland for nearly 20 years through Mary Queen of Scots, plotting to invade England and overthrow Elizabeth I. And...

  • 🎧 Children in Tudor England

    What was it like to grow up in Tudor England? How were children cared for, what did they play with, and which subjects were they taught?

    In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor Nicholas Orme who, in his new book Tudor Children, provides a rich surve...

  • 🎧 The Murder of Christopher Marlowe

    This month on Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb investigates four of history’s most notorious murders and brutal crimes.

    In this first episode she’s joined by Charles Nicholl to dig deeper into the mystery of the 1593 murder of the brilliant and controversial playwright Christophe...

  • 🎧 Henrietta Maria, Charles I’s Queen Consort

    Charles I's Queen Henrietta Maria was perhaps the most reviled consort to have worn the crown of Britain's three kingdoms. To this day, she remains the wife who turned her husband Catholic - causing a civil war - and a cruel and bigoted mother.

    In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professor S...

  • 🎧 Marguerite de Navarre: Mother of Renaissance France

    Marguerite de Navarre (1492-1549) was an influential diplomat and political activist, an outstanding patron of philosophers and artists, an accomplished writer and poet, and sister to King François I of France. She has been described as the “Mother of the Renaissance in France”.

    In this episode...

  • 🎧 When London Shipped Poor Children to America

    In 1618, almost 100 impoverished children from London - some as young as eight - arrived in Jamestown, Virginia to labour in the growing colony. It was the first example of transporting children to colonies that would continue into the twentieth century.

    In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, ...

  • 🎧 Hatton: Elizabeth I's Favourite?

    In the cut-throat world of the Elizabethan court, Sir Christopher Hatton became one of Elizabeth I’s favourites. After catching her eye in 1561, Hatton was quickly promoted to the Privy Council, making a significant impact on Elizabeth’s complex religious policy. Yet Hatton has often been oversh...

  • 🎧 Demonic Possession in 17th-Century Canada

    When strange signs appeared in the sky over Quebec in 1660, the French settlers started to worry about evil forces in their midst. Then, a teenaged servant called Barbe Hallay started to act as if she were possessed by demons. She accused a local miller of bewitching her and, the following year, ...

  • 🎧 Batavia: The Worst Shipwreck in History

    In 1628, a Dutch East India flagship called Batavia set sail from the Netherlands, never to reach her destination. Eight months into the voyage, the ship was wrecked on coral reef off the western coast of Australia. What then befell her surviving crew and passengers was horrifying and tragic. It ...

  • 🎧 Swords in Elizabethan England

    In Elizabethan England, swords were everywhere. Hanging on girdles, used in plays and depicted in paintings, they were an important marker of status and martial prowess. Swordplay was a popular martial art and pastime enjoyed by all rungs of Tudor society. But what would these swords have looked ...

  • 🎧 The Discovery of Nonsuch Palace

    In April 1538 - to celebrate the birth of Prince Edward and the 30th anniversary of his reign - King Henry VIII began work on a royal palace in Surrey, designed to be unequalled as a celebration of the power and the grandeur of the Tudor dynasty: Nonsuch Palace.

    Henry spared no expense on the es...

  • 🎧 How Indigenous Americans Discovered Europe

    We have long been taught that modern global history began when the 'Old World' encountered the 'New', when Christopher Columbus 'discovered' America in 1492. But, in a groundbreaking new book, Dr. Caroline Dodds Pennock conclusively shows that for tens of thousands of Aztecs, Maya, Totonacs, Inui...

  • 🎧 Louis XIII and Cardinal Richelieu

    The Three Musketeers paints a picture of King Louis XIII of France as a rather weak monarch controlled by his powerful chief minister Cardinal Richelieu. Louis’ reign is generally thought of as being the beginning of the “age of absolutism” when ministers like Richelieu were in the ascendancy and...