🎧 Not Just the Tudors

🎧 Not Just the Tudors

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Suzannah Lipscomb talks about everything from the Aztecs to witches, Velázquez to Shakespeare, Mughal India to the Mayflower. Not, in other words, just the Tudors, but most definitely also the Tudors.

Each episode Suzannah is joined by historians and experts to reveal incredible stories about one of the most fascinating periods in history.

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🎧 Not Just the Tudors
  • 🎧 Shakespeare's London

    In this third special episode of Not Just the Tudors celebrating the 400th anniversary of the publication of Shakespeare’s First Folio, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb investigates the nature of theatre-going in Elizabethan London with Dr. Owen Price.  How were theatres built? What was the experience...

  • 🎧 Transgender Fairies in Early Modern Literature

    Today we think of fairies on the stage and in stories as often cute, ultra-feminine and unthreatening. But in Early Modern literature, fairies were supernatural often gender-fluid beings - just think of Ariel in The Tempest.

    In this special episode of Not Just the Tudors for Pride Month, Profess...

  • 🎧 Elizabeth I's Royal Tours

    Every spring and summer of her 44 year reign, Queen Elizabeth I insisted that her court go "on progress" — royal visits to towns and aristocratic homes. These trips provided the only direct contact most people had with their monarch.

    In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lip...

  • 🎧 Cromwell, Boleyn & Aragon: A New Discovery

    Experts at Hever Castle - the childhood home of Anne Boleyn - have made an extraordinary discovery. They’ve established that an ornate 1527 prayer book — kept in a Cambridge library for more than 350 years — belonged to Henry VIII’s Chief Minister Thomas Cromwell and appears in Holbein’s portrait...

  • 🎧 Shakespeare’s First Folio: Politics, People & Printing

    Shakespeare’s First Folio — the first book to contain 36 of his plays, 18 of which had not been in print before — was published in 1623.

    In the second of her special series marking its 400th anniversary, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb delves into the political and social story behind its printing. ...

  • 🎧 Elizabethan 'Travel Liar' The Truth about David Ingram

     In 1567, a sailor named David Ingram sailed from Plymouth with 400 others on a slaving expedition. The ensuing events read like a fantastic adventure story: shipwrecked in a hurricane off Mexico, a battle with - and imprisonment by - the Spanish, escape and a 3000 mile trek to Canada. Ingram wa...

  • 🎧 Mary Queen of Scots, Catherine de' Medici & Elisabeth de Valois

    Three powerful Renaissance queens all lived together at the French court for many years. They were bound together through blood and marriage, alliance and friendship — bonds that were tested when they were forced to scatter to different kingdoms. 

    In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professo...

  • 🎧 Origins of the Forbidden Fruit Myth

    How did the apple become the dominant symbol of temptation and sin, when it isn’t even mentioned in the Bible story of Adam and Eve? 

    In this episode of Gone Medieval, Matt Lewis meets Professor Azzan Yadin-Israel who has pursued this mystery across art and religious history, uncovering where, ...

  • 🎧 Shakespeare's First Folio

    Four hundred years ago in 1623, the first collected edition of Shakespeare's plays was printed. Known as the First Folio, the book was integral to establishing Shakespeare's posthumous reputation just seven years after his death.

    In the first of four special episodes of Not Just the Tudors celeb...

  • 🎧 Great Fire of London

    Why do we call the Great Fire of London in 1666 “great”? Was it because of the significant challenge it posed to authorities and residents as they sought to bring it under control? Was it because of the extent of its devastation? Or
    was it because it occurred during an eventful couple of years wh...

  • 🎧 Tudors in Ireland

    King Henry VII and his Tudor heirs knew very little about Ireland, over which they ruled in name at least. During the 118 years of Tudor rule, not one of its monarchs ever set foot in the Emerald Isle. Yet the history of the Tudor monarchy cannot fully be told without understanding its relations ...

  • 🎧 Obscene Jokes in the Early Modern Period

    In the 16th Century, rude jokes and scatological humour were just as much a feature of life as they are today.  Between 1529 and 1539, a Swiss linen trader called Johannes Rütiner included many jokes and humorous anecdotes in his personal notebooks. They offer an amazing insight into both the jo...

  • 🎧 Anne Boleyn & Katherine of Aragon: Rival Queens?

    History has painted Katherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn in two very different hues: one wife, one mistress; one Spanish, one French; one committed Catholic, one radical reformer. But a new exhibition at Hever Castle examines one curious moment of confluence, right in the midst of the crucial year...

  • 🎧 Enslaved Children in 16th Century Spain

    Following the Second Granada War (1568-70), thousands of Moriscos in Spain were exiled, imprisoned or enslaved. Moriscos were former Muslims who had been compelled to convert to Roman Catholicism. But in 1572, Spanish King Philip II made the enslavement of Morisco children illegal. Yet they were ...

  • 🎧 Witches of St Osyth

    In March 1582, two women from the small Essex village of St Osyth, were hanged for the crime of witchcraft. Several others, including one man, died in prison, in what was a shocking and highly localised witch-hunt. 

    In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Pro...

  • 🎧 Coronations of Charles I and Charles II

    What could be more topical this week than looking back at the coronations of the first two Kings Charles. Charles I’s reign is best remembered for the events of the English Civil War, a conflict over the balance of power between parliament and royal supremacy which resulted in his execution and t...

  • 🎧 England’s First Ambassador to India: Thomas Roe

    When Thomas Roe arrived in India in 1616 as James I's first ambassador to the Mughal Empire, the English barely had a toehold in the subcontinent. Roe was representing a kingdom that was beset by financial woes and deeply conflicted about its identity. Meanwhile, the court Roe entered was wealthy...

  • 🎧 Mary Rose: Henry VIII’s Foreign Crew

    In the 16th century, “strangers” was the name used in England for people who were born in territories not controlled by the Tudor monarchy. Thinking about Henry VIII’s armed forces, we might not expect to find “strangers” among them - but there were. 

    In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Prof...

  • 🎧 Bess's Hardwick Hall

    Hardwick Hall is a triumph of Elizabethan architecture. Built in the late sixteenth century, its halls, corridors and staircases embody the magnificence of the Renaissance period in England. But they also tell the story of the remarkable woman who built it in a patriarchal age - the four-times-ma...

  • 🎧 John Donne: England's Greatest Love Poet

    John Donne was a scholar of law, a sea adventurer, an MP, a priest, the Dean of St Paul's Cathedral - and perhaps the greatest love poet in the history of the English language. He converted from Catholicism to Protestantism, was jailed for marrying a high-born girl without her father's consent, s...

  • 🎧 Willoughbyland: England's Lost Colony

    When Sir Walter Raleigh set out to South America to find the legendary city of El Dorado, he paved the way for a series of adventurers who would struggle against the harsh reality of South America’s wild jungles. Six decades later, when a group of English gentlemen expelled from England chose to ...

  • 🎧 Mary, Queen of Scots on Film: The Historians’ Verdict

    What do you get when you bring together five top historians to debate Mary, Queen of Scots on film? History with the gloves off - our second special episode of Not Just the Tudors Lates! This time, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb takes as her starting point the tragic life of the Scottish Queen and h...

  • 🎧 How People Died in 16th Century London

    In one week in London in September, 1665, no fewer than 47 different causes of death were reported, including consumption, fever, dropsy, being frightened, grief, worms, vomiting, and plague. We know this because of a record called a Bill of Mortality, a broad sheet that was printed to list the n...

  • 🎧 Creator of Don Quixote: Cervantes

    In the early 17th century, an aged veteran of Spain's wars against the Ottoman Empire published a book. It was the story of a poor nobleman who deludes himself that he is a knight errant and sets off on hilarious adventures. Don Quixote went on to sell more copies than any other book beside the B...