🎧 Not Just the Tudors

🎧 Not Just the Tudors

Suzannah Lipscomb talks about everything from the Aztecs to witches, Velázquez to Shakespeare, Mughal India to the Mayflower. Not, in other words, just the Tudors, but most definitely also the Tudors.

Each episode Suzannah is joined by historians and experts to reveal incredible stories about one of the most fascinating periods in history.

Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here: https://www.historyhit.com/sign-up-to-history-hit/?utm_source=timelinenewsletter&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=Timeline+Podcast+Campaign

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🎧 Not Just the Tudors
  • 🎧 Marguerite de Navarre: Mother of Renaissance France

    Marguerite de Navarre (1492-1549) was an influential diplomat and political activist, an outstanding patron of philosophers and artists, an accomplished writer and poet, and sister to King François I of France. She has been described as the “Mother of the Renaissance in France”.

    In this episode...

  • 🎧 When London Shipped Poor Children to America

    In 1618, almost 100 impoverished children from London - some as young as eight - arrived in Jamestown, Virginia to labour in the growing colony. It was the first example of transporting children to colonies that would continue into the twentieth century.

    In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, ...

  • 🎧 Hatton: Elizabeth I's Favourite?

    In the cut-throat world of the Elizabethan court, Sir Christopher Hatton became one of Elizabeth I’s favourites. After catching her eye in 1561, Hatton was quickly promoted to the Privy Council, making a significant impact on Elizabeth’s complex religious policy. Yet Hatton has often been oversh...

  • 🎧 Demonic Possession in 17th-Century Canada

    When strange signs appeared in the sky over Quebec in 1660, the French settlers started to worry about evil forces in their midst. Then, a teenaged servant called Barbe Hallay started to act as if she were possessed by demons. She accused a local miller of bewitching her and, the following year, ...

  • 🎧 Batavia: The Worst Shipwreck in History

    In 1628, a Dutch East India flagship called Batavia set sail from the Netherlands, never to reach her destination. Eight months into the voyage, the ship was wrecked on coral reef off the western coast of Australia. What then befell her surviving crew and passengers was horrifying and tragic. It ...

  • 🎧 Swords in Elizabethan England

    In Elizabethan England, swords were everywhere. Hanging on girdles, used in plays and depicted in paintings, they were an important marker of status and martial prowess. Swordplay was a popular martial art and pastime enjoyed by all rungs of Tudor society. But what would these swords have looked ...

  • 🎧 The Discovery of Nonsuch Palace

    In April 1538 - to celebrate the birth of Prince Edward and the 30th anniversary of his reign - King Henry VIII began work on a royal palace in Surrey, designed to be unequalled as a celebration of the power and the grandeur of the Tudor dynasty: Nonsuch Palace.

    Henry spared no expense on the es...

  • 🎧 How Indigenous Americans Discovered Europe

    We have long been taught that modern global history began when the 'Old World' encountered the 'New', when Christopher Columbus 'discovered' America in 1492. But, in a groundbreaking new book, Dr. Caroline Dodds Pennock conclusively shows that for tens of thousands of Aztecs, Maya, Totonacs, Inui...

  • 🎧 Louis XIII and Cardinal Richelieu

    The Three Musketeers paints a picture of King Louis XIII of France as a rather weak monarch controlled by his powerful chief minister Cardinal Richelieu. Louis’ reign is generally thought of as being the beginning of the “age of absolutism” when ministers like Richelieu were in the ascendancy and...

  • 🎧 Birth of the Gregorian calendar

    Many of us are seeing in a new year, but of course there are, even today, several different ways of marking dates and years in various parts of the world. The most popular calendar, though, is the Gregorian, introduced in October 1852 by Pope Gregory XIII.

    In this episode of Not Just the Tudors,...

  • 🎧 The Biggest Discoveries of 2022

    Professor Suzannah Lipscomb presents her annual review of the year, recommending the finest history books she has discovered, the best television shows she’s watched, and the biggest historical discoveries that have changed the way we understand - or which shed new light upon - the Tudors, but no...

  • 🎧 Tudor Christmas Carols

    A Tudor Christmas would have probably featured as much singing as we have today, if not more, and surprisingly many of the carols would have been the same: In Dulci Jubilo, The Coventry Carol, Gabriel’s message were among the yuletide hits that would have resounded through Tudor era churches.

    In...

  • 🎧 Filth, Noise & Stench in England

    In English cities of the 17th century, there was plenty to offend the eyes, ears, nose, taste buds, and skin of inhabitants. Residents were scarred by smallpox, refuse rotted in the streets, pigs and dogs roamed free.

    In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to...

  • 🎧 The First Printed English Bible

    England was the only European country that completely banned translating the Bible. The dissident Lollards had produced one after the death of their hero, the radical 14th-century theologian John Wycliffe, but owning a copy could be a capital offence. When idealistic humanist William Tyndale prin...

  • 🎧 Fall of the Ming Dynasty

    In 1627 Zhu Youjian, the Chongzhen Emperor, became the 17th - and what would turn out to be the last - Emperor of China’s Ming Dynasty. It had ruled a vast realm stretching 6.5 million square kilometres for 250 years.

    In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to P...

  • 🎧 Public Executions in London

    For at least 700 years, presumed criminals were publicly executed in London. Such occasions were often gruesome, gory and very popular.

    A new exhibition at the Museum of London Docklands explores this grisly history - who the recipients of capital punishment were, the places where they met their...

  • 🎧 Football & the Tudors

    Already in 2022 we have celebrated England’s Lionesses winning the Women’s European Championships, and this month you may well be waiting with bated breath to see how England’s men fare in the World Cup.

    Such anticipation, celebration — and sometimes commiseration — are nothing new in football....

  • 🎧 Making Babies in the 17th Century

    Making babies was a mysterious process for people in early modern England. Their ideas about conception, pregnancy and childbirth tell us much about their attitudes towards gender and power at that time.

    In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, first released in September 2021, Professor Suzannah...

  • 🎧 Henry VIII’s Lost Brother, Prince Arthur

    During the early part of the sixteenth century England should have been ruled by King Arthur Tudor with his wife Catherine of Aragon as Queen. Had the first-born son of Henry VII lived into adulthood, his younger brother would never have become King Henry VIII and married - and divorced - Arthur’...

  • 🎧 Huygens: Europe’s Greatest Scientist

    Christiaan Huygens was the greatest scientist working in the vital period between Galileo and Newton, as the scientific revolution gathered pace. He discovered Saturn’s ring, invented the accurate pendulum clock, and devised a wave theory of light far ahead of its time.

    In this edition of Not Ju...

  • 🎧 Mary, Queen of Scots: The Material Evidence

    Mary, Queen of Scots wore red at her execution as a symbol of Catholic martyrdom. It was the climax of a life throughout which Mary used textiles to advance her political agenda, affirm her royal lineage and tell her story - from her lavish gowns to the subversive messages she embroidered in capt...

  • 🎧 A Happy Tudor New Year

    Today we're sharing again a fascinating podcast first released at this time last Christmas.

    For the Tudors, Christmas Day was not traditionally the date when gifts were given. The Twelve Days of Christmas begin on 25 December and end at Epiphany, 6 January - also known as Twelfth Night. In Tudor...

  • 🎧 Inca Apocalypse

    For many, the word Inca conjures up images of an ancient civilisation in South America, swiftly conquered by the Spanish in their quest for gold and Christian converts.

    In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb sets out to find out the truth about the Incas with Profess...

  • 🎧 Oliver Cromwell’s Republic

    On 30 January 1649, King Charles I was executed for treason. Within weeks the monarchy had been abolished and the House of Lords discarded. The people were now the sovereign force in the land. What this meant, and where it would lead, no one knew.

    In her new book, The Restless Republic: Britain ...