Latest Podcasts 🎧

Share
  • 🎧 Operation Barbarossa

    On 22 June 1941 Hitler unleashed Operation Barbarossa the biggest military operation in human history. More than 3 million men of the Axis poured into the Soviet Union beginning a conflict, that even within the context of the Second World War, was unprecedented in both its scale and savagery. Ope...

  • 🎧 Dirty Love: The Ancient Greek Novel

    The novel, and in particular the romance genre, is at the heart of a billion dollar industry, but when did they originate. In this episode, Professor Tim Whitmarsh from the University of Cambridge takes us back to some of the world’s earliest fictional narratives, the novels of Ancient Greece in ...

  • 🎧 The Truth About The Berserkers

    To go berserk, meaning out of control with anger or excitement: the phrase originates from stories of the Berserkers, but what do we really know about them? Dangerous to friend or foe, the Berserkers are said to have fought feuds in the nude or even to have taken magic mushrooms in battle, but ho...

  • 🎧 John of Gaunt

    Born in 1340 as the younger brother of the Black Prince, John of Gaunt's life is captivating. John was a brave leader, first setting foot on the battlefield at the age of 10. Later, as one of the richest men in the country, he would uphold chivalric values, support early religious reform and cham...

  • 🎧 From Airman to Attorney General: RAF Navigator Johnny Smythe

    Beginning with his birth in 1915 in Sierra Leone, the life of John Henry Smythe OBE MBE is almost unbelievable. From becoming a navigator in the RAF during the Second World War, to being held captive in a German POW camp, to being the Senior Officer making key decisions about the futures of the p...

  • 🎧 Tragedy at the Scottish Crannog Centre

    From the Neolithic period to the early 18th century Crannogs were a feature of Scottish, Welsh and Irish lakes and estuaries enabling a unique way of life. These unusual dwellings consisted of an artificial island constructed over and in the water. The Scottish Crannog Cente on Loch Tay had a won...

  • 🎧 Black American Struggle: Riot or Revolution?

    The 1960s and early 1970s saw civil unrest and violence in the United States on a scale not seen since the civil war between black residents and the police but was this simply rioting or a revolution? Dan is joined by Elizabeth Hinton associate professor of history, African American studies, and ...

  • 🎧 The Battle of Waterloo

    After 12 years of battles against the French Republic’s various neighbours, this was Napoleon’s final stand. Although many associate its name with a Eurovision winning hit from 1974, the Battle of Waterloo was in fact devastating to the Republic and its Allied opposition. 24 thousand French and 1...

  • 🎧 Scotland's Earliest Animal Carvings: Incredible New Discovery

    Prehistoric animal carvings, thought to be up to 5,000 years old, have been discovered in Scotland for the very first time. The images, which include carvings of two red deer, were found by chance on an ancient burial site in Argyll, called Dunchraigaig Cairn. Dr Tertia Barnett, principle investi...

  • 🎧 Churchill's Daughters: The Privilege and the Pain

    Winston Churchill's daughters Diana, Sarah, Marigold and Mary are often overshadowed by their father's extraordinary fame but they also lived fascinating lives and were often present at many of the seismic moments of history. Their lives were far from easy though. Marigold died at the age of two,...

  • 🎧 The Curious History of Postcards

    For many people sending a postcard is an enjoyable part of any seaside trip but rather than just being a novelty they were once a vital form of communication and often the quickest way to contact your friends and relatives. Dan is joined by Chris Taft and Georgina Tomlinson from the postal museum...

  • 🎧 The Battle of Himera

    480 BC is a year widely-celebrated in Greek history – when Leonidas and his core of 300 Spartans heroically defended against a powerful Persian army at Thermopylae and an outnumbered, Athenian-led navy defeated a mighty Persian armada at Salamis. Yet it was not just off the coast of Athens that o...

  • 🎧 The Emperor: The extraordinary Charles V

    In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb delves into the fascinating life and career of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V (1500–1558), who ruled Spain, Germany, the Netherlands, and much of Italy and Central and South America.

    Suzannah is joined by Professor Geoffrey Parker, one of ...

  • 🎧 Sex in the Middle Ages

    Despite being a key part of society and everyday life, medieval sexuality was probably left out of your history lessons at school. But how much do we really know about these very private aspects of life in the Middle Ages? Dr Cat Jarman is joined by historian Dr Eleanor Janega from the London Sch...

  • 🎧 Everything You Need to Know about the Anglo-Saxons

    The Anglo-Saxon period is vital for the formation of England and the UK as we know it but is a difficult era to fully understand. The departure of the Romans left a power vacuum that was filled by warlords with violence, foreign invasion, occupation and religious strife being endemic. But out of ...

  • 🎧 The Euros

    England holds the slightly unwanted title for the most appearances in the Euros without ever reaching a final, so why the excitement when it comes back around every four years?
    Football journalist and podcaster Tom Fordyce joins Dan to chat about the history of the Euros, memorable moments, and w...

  • 🎧 Codes, Spies and a Shadow War: The Fight for the Middle East

    Erwin Rommel, the β€˜Desert Fox’, known as such because from 1940 until the end of 1942, he led his troops across the deserts of North Africa and towards the Middle East with an often uncanny sense of his enemies' plans and weaknesses. In this episode, we uncover the secret to this success. Gershom...

  • 🎧 The Heiress, the Kidnap, and the Making of London

    After the Great Plague of 1665 and the Great Fire of London in 1666 London was on its knees with its population decimated and the heart of the city burnt out, but from the ashes, it would rise phoenix-like to become one of the world's dominant economic and cultural centres. Dan is joined by autho...

  • 🎧 Identity and Society in Medieval Africa

    It’s no secret that Africa’s history is documented quite differently compared to its European counterparts. Contrastingly relying on elements such as oral traditions and art. Joined by anthropologist and historian Luke Pepera, We examine African history. Delving into Africa’s difference in attach...

  • 🎧 Brittany: Shaped by the Atlantic

    Stretching out from the north west of France, Brittany has long been as identifiable with the Atlantic Ocean as with its continental neighbours in Europe. Whilst Sir Barry Cunliffe’s research and archaeological interests have taken him far and wide over the last six decades, this close neighbour ...

  • 🎧 Gordon Brown on How to save the World

    Gordon Brown stood at the pinnacle of UK politics for 13 years first as Chancellor of the Exchequer and the as Prime Minister but it is as a private citizen that he now seeks to set out and help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. In this episode, Dan speaks to Gordon Brown about hi...

  • 🎧 Death Marches: Evidence and Memory

    As the Allies advanced through Europe in early 1945, the Nazis embarked on one final escalation of the Holocaust. Hundreds of thousands of prisoners, already weak and starving from their treatment in the camp system, were forcibly marched away from the possibility of liberation. For this episode,...

  • 🎧 Alexander the Great’s Corpse and the Greatest Heist in History

    Alexander the Great is one of the most famous generals and empire builders in history, but the story of his death is almost as remarkable as his life. Tristan Hughes host of the History Hit podcast The Ancients, and Alexander the Great superfan, joins Dan to tell the almost unbelievable tale of w...

  • 🎧 Nero: Taking to the Stage

    In popular culture, Nero is thought of as the Emperor who played the fiddle as Rome burned to the ground. Whilst this might not be strictly factual, it does hint towards another side of this infamous character. For this episode, Dr Shushma Malik returns to The Ancients to discuss Nero's interest ...