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  • 1833: The Year Britain Abolished Slavery

    1 season

    On 28 August 1833, the Slavery Abolition Act was given royal assent in Britain. This legislation terminated an institution that, for generations, had been the source of an incredibly lucrative trade and commerce.

    It was not only planters who benefitted from the significant West Indian branch of ...

  • Edinburgh New Town: From Squalor to Splendour

    Alice Loxton uncovers the thrilling transformation of Edinburgh, a city which was once the most overcrowded, dangerous and pungent cities in the whole of Europe, where tottering medieval tenement blocks were surrounded by a bubbling cesspit of raw sewage. With the city bursting at its seams - and...

  • Killing God: The Assassination of Julius Caesar

    15 March - 'The Ides of March'. It is arguably the most well known date in ancient history. On that day in 44 BC the Roman statesman Julius Caesar was assassinated by a group of senatorial conspirators in the heart of Rome. But why was this political giant of ancient Rome assassinated? How did th...

  • 1807: The Year Britain Abolished its Slave Trade

    1 season

    Documentary, using the academic expertise of Professor Christer Petley at the University of Southampton, exploring the rise of the Abolition movement in Britain in the late 18th century and its ultimate success in passing a bill (1807 Abolition Act) that outlawed the trade in Africans across the ...

  • The First Britons

    If the words British history conjure up images of Elizabeth I, Shakespeare, Boudica, Mary Seacole, The Beatles and the Blitz, you’re squinting at a small spec of the history of humanity of these Isles. Even if you go back to the Roman invasion of Britain in 43 AD, or even further to the Iron Age ...

  • Australia's Pearl Harbor: The Bombing of Darwin

    In February 1942, the Second World War came to Australia. The same Japanese fleet that had attacked Pearl Harbor only ten weeks before had set its sights on a new target. The harbour town of Darwin. In two separate attacks on February 19 1942, nearly 250 Japanese aircraft wreaked havoc on the lig...

  • Whitechapel Murders: Walking in the Footsteps of Jack the Ripper

    Historian Mat McLachlan walks down the streets of Whitechapel with the founder of the original Aldgate East Jack the Ripper tour, Richard Jones. They visit some the key sites associated with the Whitechapel murders of the late 1880s and early 1890s.

  • Swansea Jack: The Dog who Saved a City

    The name Jack is synonymous with the people of Swansea and the supporters are known as The Jack Army.

    In this film, Chris Lloyd follows in the footsteps of the city’s four legged hero why the legacy he left behind has not only inspired a generation but has given this city its identity.

    This is...

  • The Caerphilly Spitfire Crash

    In this short film, Chris Lloyd looks into the story behind the Spitfire that crashed into a Welsh mountain outside the town of Caerphilly during a training flight on 7 November 1941. Lloyd explores how the community of the town came together to remember a man, Canadian pilot Sergeant Ivan Raymon...

  • Broadway Tower: A Folly of Delight and Daring

    High on the peak of the Cotswolds stands one of the most remarkable buildings in Britain. Built as a folly in the final days of the 18th century, Broadway Tower sprung up during the height of the French Revolutionary Wars under the distracted watch of the architect James Wyatt. In the following y...

  • The Cardiff Swastika and How the City Fought Back

    In 1938, the Mayor of Cardiff orders a swastika to be flown over City hall. This film explains why and how two people risked life and limb to pull it down.

  • Aircraft of the Battle of Britain

    Historian Mat McLachlan visits the Royal Air Force Museum in London to explore four iconic aircraft, which all served in the Battle of Britain - the Hawker Hurricane, the Supermarine Spitfire, the Messerschmitt Bf 109 and the Fiat CR.42. Join him and museum historian Kris Hendrix as they enjoy un...

  • Animals in Conflict

    Human lives are entangled with those of other animals; we live with cats, we use chickens for their eggs, cows for their milk, and occasionally enjoy a trip to the local farm or zoo. But humans have also enlisted animals to help fight their wars. Tracking the use of horses and dogs in warfare can...

  • Beam Benders

    Alongside the use of RADAR in World War Two, a special wing of the RAF was set up to intercept, disrupt and 'bend' radio signals from Germany. Luftwaffe planes from Germany followed these signals in order to drop bombs effectively on their targets. Because of the untold story of the RAF 80 Wing U...

  • Edgehill: A Fight of Spite and Spleen

    When Charles I acceded to the throne in 1625, there was every reason to hope his reign would be as peaceful and prosperous as any. But by 1642, after almost two decades of religious aggravation and personal ‘tyranny’, tensions reached boiling point. The chance for peaceful resolution and diplomat...

  • Hatshepsut: She Who Would Be King

    Hatshepsut – whose name means “foremost of noblewomen” – was an exceptional figure in the history of Ancient Egypt. Only the second woman in history to assume the title of pharaoh, during her reign she oversaw the building of monumental temples, established trade connections with far away African...

  • Hidden in the Trees: Cardiff's Forgotten Landmark

    For nearly a thousand years, something high in the forest has been watching over the Welsh capital. A community pulled together in the Sixties, giving St. Mary's church in Caerau a short new life.

  • History-Indoors

    1 season

    At History Indoors, we bring history… indoors! We host online talks from some of the best historical experts so you can enjoy some of the newest historical ideas from the comfort of your own home.

  • Independence or Death: The Haitian Revolution

    The Haitian Revolution caused a seismic shift in global politics. When a mixture of different groups on the French colony of Saint Domingue rose against the colonists, few expected the rebellion to succeed. However, under the leadership of figures such as Toussaint L'Ouverture, Henry Christophe a...

  • Losing Sight of the Glory: Medical Reflections on the War

    Ex-surgeon and Napoleonic era historian Michael Crumplin takes us through the medical challenges and horrors faced in the Napoleonic Wars.

  • Pets at War

    Jack collaborates with Clare Campbell (Daily Mail Journalist and author of Bonzo's War) and her husband, Christy (historian), to unravel the story of the tragic fate of some cats and dogs on the eve of World War Two known as the Great British Pet Massacre of 1939. Following this heart-breaking ev...

  • The Cardiff Castle Hidden in the Centre of London

    Chris Lloyd spotted a house in London which reminded him of Cardiff. It turned out it had a huge link to the Welsh capital, as well as currently having a very famous resident.

  • The Eleanor Crosses: England's Greatest Love Story

    Edward I is one of the most notorious rulers of English history. With a reputation for military brutishness and political ruthlessness, he was rumoured to have once frightened a man to death. But in November 1290, one event brought this warrior king crashing to the ground: the death of his belove...

  • The Ghost Army of World War Two

    The Allied plans for Normandy stretched far beyond the D-Day landings themselves. Alongside the plans for DDay, the Allies created a series of deception plans to trick the Germans as to where the Allies would launch their invasion. This plan included inflatable tanks, jamming their radar systems ...